Periodontics

Periodontics

Without the support of healthy gums and bones teeth can’t function long term”

This area of dentistry covers the care of gums and bone supporting the teeth. It is important to have regular cleaning of your teeth to prevent gum disease. Lifestyle factors can also play a large part in gum disease occurrence.

The longer plaque and tartar are on teeth, the more harmful they become. The bacteria cause inflammation of the gums that is called “gingivitis.” In gingivitis, the gums become red, swollen and can bleed easily.

Gingivitis is a mild form of gum disease that can usually be reversed with daily brushing and flossing, and regular cleaning by a dentist or dental hygienist. This form of gum disease does not involve any loss of bone and tissue that hold teeth in place.

When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to “periodontitis” (which means “inflammation around the tooth”). In periodontics, gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces (called “pockets”) that become infected. The body’s immune system fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Bacterial toxins and the body’s natural response to infection start to break down the bone and connective tissue that hold teeth in place. If not treated, the bones, gums, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. The teeth may eventually become loose and have to be removed.

Symptoms of gum disease include:
• Bad breath that won’t go away
• Red or swollen gums
• Tender or bleeding gums
• Painful chewing
• Loose teeth
• Sensitive teeth
• Receding gums or longer appearing teeth